Blogs
Posts By Date
Categories

Testimonials

Nadine & Jason
Nervous and inexperienced with buying a new home we were very relieved to find a Realtor like Mike. Keeping in touch with us and sending us information on homes on a daily basis, Mike was just as excited about finding us a home as we were to buy one. He was extremely accommodating to our busy schedules. Most importantly we knew we could rely on him for honest advice and information, which he was more...
Read more...
Jason F.
A very professional and knowledgeable real estate team. They were always on time and kept you informed of what was going on. I will definitely use them when its time to move again.
Read more...

The Edmonton Real Estate Blog, Market Information, Advise & Opinion

 

Do You Know the Basics of Home Security?

Most people feel confident about the basics of Locked & Secured Edmonton Homehome security. For example: Keep all doors locked. Have a light on in the house while away. Never hide a key outside in an obvious place, like under the mat. Yet, almost a million and a half (WOW!) properties get burglarized in North America each year. So how can you prevent that from happening to your home? Here are a few less known home security basics:


  • Actually, never hide a key outside. Thieves know all the hiding places. Instead, make sure all family members have a key.
  • Two-thirds of home burglaries occur during the day. So be extra vigilant about making sure doors and windows are locked while you're away at work during the day.
  • Surprisingly, most thieves are not daring. They are 2.7 times more likely to target a home without an alarm system. At the very least, nave some signs prominently displaying an alarm company. Sometimes, merely see these signs will make the burglar move on.
  • Thieves will attempt to force entry throughBarred Edmonton patio door to increase your home security sliding-style doors and windows first. So make sure these have a locking bar or extra bolt lock.
  • Surprising, 40% of household burglaries do not involve forced entry. The thief is able to slip in through an unlocked window or door.
  • Don't show off possessions! An imported racing bike/fancy ski-doo parked next to the garage or expensive audio equipment clearly seen through a window, is an invitation to burglars.
  • Take a look at the lighting and landscaping around your property. Are there spots where a thief could easily hide? If so, make some changes like add motion enabled lights.
  • When planning a trip, have a trusted neighbor or family pick up newspapers, flyers and anything else that may accumulate at your front door.

Edmonton Neighbors have better stuff front door welcome mat

The Edmonton Police Service will have more tips and special programs for keeping your home secure. Give them a call. If you can think of anymore basic tips I could add, please let call me 780-242-5229 or thru my contact page.

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

Inexpensive Ways to Reduce Your Energy Bill

You could get upgraded insulation installed in all the walls of your home, or buy a new high-efficiency furnace and air conditioner. These improvements would certainly reduce Programable thermostat for your Edmonton homeyour energy costs – but they each require a significant investment.

 

What if you don't have the budget?

 

There are a lot of little things you can do to make a big difference in your heating or cooling bill. Here are just a few examples:

 

  • Turn down the thermostat a couple of degrees in winter. (And turn it up a few notches in summer.) Chances are, you'll hardly notice the difference in comfort, and you'll cut your heating/cooling costs by about 5%.
  • Do you need the air conditioner on all the time during the summer months? Consider turning it way up, or completely off, at night when it's cooler outside.
  • Invest in a programmable thermostat. That way, you'll be able to set up a schedule that uses less  heating/cooling energy while you’re out of the house at work or sleeping.
  • Let the sunshine in through windows in the winter (and block the sun where possible in the summer.) "Passive heat gain" can contribute to up to 20% of the heat in your home. Best of all, the sun is free.
  • Use energy efficient lights throughout your home. These can cut the cost of lighting by Compact fluorescent light bulbs are excellent to upgrade your Edmonton homeup to 40%! Look for compact fluorescent lights (CFL) at your hardware store.
  • Be careful with outside lights, which can use a lot of energy! Turn them off before you go to bed or, better still, use programmable outside lighting that can be set to turn off automatically.

These are just a few ideas for reducing your energy bill. If you do some research, you can probably discover many other ways to cut your costs. It's worth the effort! If you want some more tips how to improve your home's energy footprint, call me 780-242-5229 or thru my contact page. I have a free copies of the Federal government's book from the energy audit for anybody interested improving their home energy usage.

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

Don't Overprice Your Home!

Usually, four common strategies are used to price a home. Understanding these techniques can help you get a better deal on your home, while matching your needs.

Over priced Edmonton home for sale sign

1. Greatly overpriced
Every seller wants to get the best price for their home. In a hot seller's market you need to careful with multiple offers, the battle may be won by inflating the price, anywhere from 5-10% of its true market value. Determine a fair offering price range with your REALTOR® (me please) before getting into a bidding war with multiple offers.  Too high a price could leave the home on the market for months (not good). The home could be great, just offered at the wrong price. If it does not sell, it could be considered a problem. The price may have to be reduced to sell it.

2. Somewhat overpriced
Homes in this category also tend to sit longer on the market. The reasons: there may be room for negotiation in the price, or the seller is emotionally attached to the home.

Edmonton Seller wanting more money & buyer offering less money

3. Priced at fair market value
These homes tend to sell within a reasonable time usually within the average Days on Market (DOM), at close to the asking price. Competitively priced, their price represents a thorough analysis of other homes on the market.

4. Priced below fair market value
For various reasons (including health, relocation, condition of the home, divorce, etc), a seller may want to sell a home quickly. This type of sale often results in multiple buyers, with the home being sold quickly.

I can provide you with a thorough analysis of any home you are considering to sell. This price will be based on market conditions, similar homes in the neighbourhood and condition of the home. At the same time, as your REALTOR®,  I'll work with you to find a new home which meets your needs in a great neighbourhood. Call me direct 780-242-5229 or go to my contact page.

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

10 Tips Before Listing Your Edmonton Property

If you’re thinking of listing your Edmonton home to take advantage of this fall market, then now’s the time to get it in shape. Here are ten things you can do to maximize its perceived value.

Edmonton home sellers want their home sold

1. Talk to a REALTOR® (me please). Even if you feel that your home is in perfect condition, it’s a good idea to have a professional REALTOR®  look at your property. They may suggest simple changes or repairs that could help you sell your home quicker.

2. Crank up the curb appeal. Make sure when potential buyers pull up in front of your house they like what they see. Touch up exterior paint and tidy up your garden, cut your grass, etc. First impressions are huge.

3. Clean up your act. The cleaner your house, the better it will show so thoroughly clean every room in the house. Get curtains and carpets professionally cleaned. Don't forget to handrails, light switch plates, litter boxes and pickup backyard doggie-doo (even in the snow).

4. Clear out the clutter. Make rooms look bigger by getting rid of the clutter. Put extra furniture and items in a storage locker, garage or neatly in a unfinished basement corner.

5. Nix the knick-knacks. As buyers walk through your home, they want to picture themselves living there. Remove your personal effects, knickknacks, family photos and collectibles. Sometime, too many collectibles are a negative.

6. Do a quick fix. Fix a dripping faucet, update handles on kitchen cabinets, replace light switches and touch up scratches on hardwood floors & paint.

7. Let the sun shine in. Buyers appreciate good light in a home. Clean the windows, remove dark curtains and put in higher wattage light bulbs (don't exceed manufacturer's maximum wattage).

8. Keep it neutral. A fresh coat of neutral paint will make rooms look clean and inviting. You may not have to repaint every room, but certainly ones that are chipped, marked or painted in bright colors. No purple or lime green walls, please!

9. Set the stage. Consider hiring a professional stager to turn your home into a true showpiece. Look for a highly experienced & local home stager.

10.Create more storage space. Look at ways to improve the storage space in your home, such as adding shelving to closets and storage rooms. Remove 50% of items in your closets to make them look HUGE.

 

Review my YouTube channels of Fit to Sell videos, review my free sellers reports then contact me for further selling preparation info. I'm sure you will be impressed my ultimate results!

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

5 Legal Tasks You Should Do Before Moving to Your New Edmonton Home

Legal tasks you should do before moving to your new Edmonton home

As your Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®), I'm always here to help. 

The Internet is full of checklists and resources to use if you are planning the move. There are definite packing timelines & there are lists with packing supplies. There are even directions on how to pack boxes properly! Moving is MUCH more than purging and organizing your personal things. There are legal tasks you need to also take care of. Here are 5 legal tasks you should complete before your move:

  1. Read your lease: Review your current lease to make sure you won't get into trouble for leaving early. You are responsible for paying rent for the entire lease term, even if you have vacated the property. If you need to move before the lease term is expired, read the lease to see if you can sublet or assign a new tenant. Check your new lease for these terms before you sign it and make sure you complete these tasks to protect your rights as a tenant. This mistake can cause lots of grief and loss of money.
  2. Protect yourself with insurance: Thoroughly read any contract with a moving company before you sign it for delivery times and insurance coverage. Reputable moving companies are required to provide some moving insurance but you should purchasing more. You should also consider stopping renter's insurance (if applicable) & start homeowner's insurance for your new home.
  3. Notify your creditors: Update your address with all of your bills to ensure you do not miss a payment. Bank accounts, car loans, RRSP & other savings comes to mind (heck, many years ago, I forgot to transfer my new address for my GIC's). Also be sure to complete a change of address with Canada Post and request your mail be forwarded to your new address. Rates are reasonable and you will thank yourself.
  4. Keep receipts if relocating/transferring for a new job position: You may be able to write off your expenses if you are required to relocate more than 50 kilometres due to a job change. Review Revenue Canada's requirements to qualify for this tax break or better yet, ask your accountant
  5. Update your estate plan: Provincial laws governing wills and estate plans differ. If you move to a different province, update your estate plan. Your family will thank you & just seems the right thing to do.

Can you think of anything else to add? If so, please contact me or call direct at 780-242-5229

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

Dealing With Multiple Offers

Multiple offers on your Edmonton home with Canadian money You may think that having to deal with multiple offers on your home is a wonderful problem. After all, there are so many buyers clamouring to purchase your Edmonton property!
The challenge, however, is picking the best offer – and that isn't always the one with the highest price. Most offers come with conditions, such as "conditional on securing  financing",  "conditional on the sale of our current property" (not a very good one) and others.
You have to consider both the price and the conditions when choosing which offer to accept. There are other considerations, too. What if someone makes a great offer
on your home, but they don't have a pre-approved mortgage and they haven’t put their current home on the market? Not good! That kind of offer is risky because it is more likely than an unconditional offer to fall through. So there's a lot to think about when you're in the seemingly enviable position of dealing with multiple offers. How do you select the right one? The answer is to have a good experienced REALTOR® (like Mike Muranetz) by your side to help you make the right decision for you & your family!
Want more tips on how to get multiple offers for your home? Call Mike today & he will show you how to make it happen on your home, even in today's market!

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

5 Questions Young Buyers Need to Ask

Young Edmonton Buyers Searching for Their First Home

Believe it or not, even in these rough economic times, the average age of the first time home buyer has been gradually decreasing. In 2008 the average age was 35 years old, and in 2011 the average age dropped to age 30. Personally, I think of all the people I know that bought a home in the last few years and many of them are 27 years old or younger (my youngest home buyer was 19 years old!), which has raised the question: are they different challenges to first-time home buyers because of their age?

It turns out, yes, different circumstances call for different situations, and if you’re a 30 something or younger individual thinking of buying a home, here are some things you need to consider.

 

1.)  Do I have a substantial down payment? An obvious challenge of buying a home at a younger age is clearly not having as much time to save money for a down payment as your older counterparts. A smaller down payment means a higher monthly mortgage payment, which is often why so many people choose to wait a few years more to save up enough money in order to have a monthly payment they can afford. Today you need minimum of 5% of purchase price to meet CMHC criteria. More is better.

 

2.) What will my mortgage rate be? Part of the criteria in applying for a loan is job stability, meaning you need to show that you have been working at a particular job for a long amount of time. For many 20-30 year olds, the length of time they have been at a job is particularly small simply because they haven’t been a part of the workforce very long. It’s perfectly natural to skip from  job to job to job during your college years, as you often have different requirements that need to be met (class schedule, moving, wage changes, seasonal work, etc.). However, this doesn’t particularly reflect well when applying for a home loan. Rates today are in the low 3%.

 

3.) Are my expectations realistic? Many young home buyers simply have no idea just how much certain features cost. A “decent amount of space” might be a completely unreasonable requirement for a 25 year old looking for an affordable place to live in SW Edmonton. Let’s be honest, the words ‘SW Edmonton’ and ‘affordable’ don’t often appear in the same sentence.

 

Young Edmonton Home Buyers Dream of Their New Home

4.) Am I ready? Every first time home buyer will need to ask themselves this question, but a young home buyer especially. A younger individual usually has more variables in their life. Are you in a stable job that you will most likely stay in (or even want to stay in) for the next 10 years? Are you sure you won’t have to move (career, relationships, family issues) in the next 10 years? In addition, research has shown that the brain isn’t even fully mature until around age 25, so are you sure you will even want to still own a home in a few years?

 

5.) Am I able to put in the work? For any first time home buyer, you have to be ready to put in a little bit of elbow grease, but for a younger home buyer, you really need to be ready to do some home renovation projects. A smaller down payment and a likely higher mortgage rate means you will probably have to limit your search to homes that need a little bit of work, and you’d better be ready (read: have the energy and skills) to fix it up a bit.

 

Can you add to these questions young buyers need to ask themselves? If so, please reach out thru my contact page.

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story

Edmonton Housing Starts Peaking in 2012

Here is something I received from the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton. A very interesting report stating Edmonton is doing great according to CMHC

 

Edmonton Housing Starts Fall 2012

Housing starts are on the rise and not expected to level out until 2013 according to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation(CMHC). Their Fall 2012 Edmonton Housing Outlook forecasts an increase of housing starts in the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area to 12,000 units in 2012. That is up 28 percent from the 9,332 starts in 2011.

The CMHC cites low mortgage rates (around 3% or so), job growth, and increased migrations as the reasons behind the growth. At the same time, the lower supply in the resale market and declining rental vacancies have increased the demand of new builds.

2012 single detached starts are expected to be 12 percent higher than in 2011 with a dip of two percent in 2013. Multiple family starts are expected to end up a whopping 48 percent higher in 2012 with over 6,400 starts compared to the 4,315 in 2011. The CMHC predict multiple family starts will drop 17 percent in 2013. (please note, those are starts, not increase of prices)

Although new home starts (by the way, I can also show you new built homes) are predicted to cool off, modest increases in home sales and pricing are still expected through 2013. The slight increase in mortgage rates coupled with employment growth predicted for 2013 means the market should remain fertile. To the end of August, average employment in Edmonton increased 3.2 per cent, representing the addition of over 20,000 jobs.

 

I also have the Fall 2012 edition of CMHC's Housing Market Outlook - Edmonton is now available and can be accessed by clicking this link.

 

Do you also agree with CMHC that Edmonton's housing is doing much better then most of the country?

Post CommentCommentsRead Full Story
Categories: ABR | address | bedroom | Bon Accord, Bon Accord Real Estate | Brookfield | Buyer | Buyers | Buying | checklist | CMA | CMHC | condo | decorating | Edmonton | ensuite | Financial | Fort Saskatchewan | garden | Gibbons | Gibbons, Gibbons Real Estate | Green | HHT | Holiday | home | Home Upgrades | House Flipping | House Hunting Trip | Housing Outlook | Insurance | Interio | Interior | Investor | kitchen | lawn | Legal | Listings | Living | Living Room | Market Value | Morinville | Morinville, Morinville Real Estate | Mortgage | Moving | Moving Day | Overpricing | pack | Pricing | REMAX | Remodeling | Renovating | Report | Rural Lac Ste. Anne County | Rural Leduc County, Rural Leduc County Real Estate | Rural Strathcona County | Rural Thorhild County, Rural Thorhild County Real Estate | Save Energy | search | Seasons | security | seller | Sellers | Sherwood Park | Smartphone | Sold | Spruce Grove | St. Albert | St. Albert, St. Albert Real Estate | Staging | Statistics | strata | Tablet | Uncategorized | Updating | Winter | Yard | Zone 01, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 02, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 03, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 05, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 06, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 07, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 08, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 09, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 12, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 13, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 14, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 15, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 16, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 19, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 20, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 21, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 23, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 27, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 28, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 29, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 30, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 35, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 51, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 53, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 55, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 56, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 58, Edmonton Real Estate | Zone 59, Edmonton Real Estate
Copyright 2017 by the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton. All Rights Reserved.
Data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton.